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Bright sparks give new energy to FCC Environment

16 Nov 2012 14:42

New apprentice programme for energy from waste

 

Recycling and renewable energy company, FCC Environment, has appointed four new apprentices at its energy from waste (EfW) plants as part of a new programme to bring specialist electrical and mechanical skills to the sector.

The specialised energy from waste (EfW) apprenticeship scheme was launched by FCC Environment this year with training provider IPS International and local colleges to help identify talented young people.

Steve Brown, operations director for FCC Environment’s GreenEnergy+ division, explained: “Waste management in the UK has changed enormously in the past few years following the drive to maximise valuable resources. A range of new technologies – particularly for capturing renewable energy from residual waste – is developing rapidly, as is the need for us to have people with the skills to match.”

Mechanical apprentice, Jack Weston-Oldham, 18, and electrical apprentice Jack Pickering, 18, both from Nottingham will be based at the Eastcroft EfW plant in Nottingham, which also serves the city’s district heating system. Mechanical apprentice, James Thomas, 18, from Chatham and electrical apprentice Mitchal Wray, 18, from Rochester will be based at the Allington EfW plant in Kent.

Karl Starkey, general manager at the Eastcroft EfW plant, said: “The sustainable management of the UK’s waste and resources is a growing and exciting sector for young people to be involved in. As more energy from waste plants are built to divert the waste we cannot recycle from landfill, specific skills will become more important. Giving our apprentices the skills now is good in the long run for them, the company and the industry as a whole.”

The apprentices will take part in a four-year programme to hone their skills for energy from waste technology. In the first 10 months, apprentices will spend four days a week doing classroom-based training and one day a week at the plant. The next three years will be spent working alongside qualified mechanics and electricians four days a week, and one day a week in the classroom.

The Eastcroft EfW plant was built in 1973 and has been completely refurbished in recent years, making it one of the most efficient in Europe. Treating up to 200,000 tonnes of waste a year, the plant provides steam for Nottingham’s district heating scheme, which in turn supplies heat to around 5,000 homes and 100 businesses across Nottingham including St Ann’s, the Lace Market, National Ice Centre, Biocity and Victoria Centre shopping centre and flats. The plant employs 38 people.

Allington EfW receives up to 500,000 tonnes a year of non-hazardous waste from households and businesses in and around Kent for energy recovery, and up to 65,000 tonnes a year of sorted, recycled materials which are separated and sent for further processing. The facility entered commercial operation in 2008, and employs more than 100 people.

ENDS

 

Notes for editors:

From waste to resource.  FCC Environment is a leading UK waste and resource management company, and is part of a global group with a strong heritage in providing services for communities and business.  Our vision is to be the environmental company of choice, delivering change for a sustainable future.  We offer:

 

Municipal services

Business waste solutions

Recycling

Green energy

Waste processing and disposal

 

We employ 2,400 people and operate more than 200 facilities across England, Scotland and Wales.

www.fccenvironment.co.uk

 

@FCC_Environment

 

For further information, please contact:

Richard Truman or Alison Etherden at Pelican PR

01457 819380

Richard.truman@pelicanpr.co.uk / alison.etherden@pelicanpr.co.uk

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